Facts about the wolly mammoth

Facts about the wolly mammoth

Facts about the wolly mammoth

Facts about the wolly mammoth

https://www.richieart.com.ng/2020/12/03/facts-about-lake-titicaca/

The woolly mammoth is a species of mammoth that lived during the Pleistocene until its extinction in the Holocene epoch.

It was one of the last in a line of mammoth species, beginning with Mammuthus subplanifrons in the early Pliocene.

The woolly mammoth began to diverge from the steppe mammoth about 800,000 years ago in East Asia.

Its closest extant relative is the Asian elephant.

Facts about the wolly mammoth

The woolly mammoth was roughly the same size as modern African elephants.

Males reached shoulder heights between 2.7 and 3.4 m (8.9 and 11.2 ft) and weighed up to 6 metric tons (6.6 short tons).

Females reached 2.6–2.9 m (8.5–9.5 ft) in shoulder heights and weighed up to 4 metric tons (4.4 short tons). A newborn calf weighed about 90 kg (200 lb). The woolly mammoth was well adapted to the cold environment during the last ice age.

It was covered in fur, with an outer covering of long guard hairs and a shorter undercoat.

 

The colour of the coat varied from dark to light. The ears and tail were short to minimise frostbite and heat loss. It had long, curved tusks and four molars, which were replaced six times during the lifetime of an individual.

Facts about the wolly mammoth

Its behaviour was similar to that of modern elephants, and it used its tusks and trunk for manipulating objects, fighting, and foraging.

The habitat of the woolly mammoth is known as “mammoth steppe” or “tundra steppe”. This environment stretched across northern Asia, many parts of Europe, and the northern part of North America during the last ice age. It was similar to the grassy steppes of modern Russia, but the flora was more diverse, abundant, and grew faster.

Grasses, sedges, shrubs, and herbaceous plants were present, and scattered trees were mainly found in southern regions.

Modern humans coexisted with woolly mammoths during the Upper Palaeolithic period when the humans entered Europe from Africa between 30,000 and 40,000 years ago.

Before this, Neanderthals had coexisted with mammoths during the Middle Palaeolithic, and already used mammoth bones for tool-making and building materials.

Woolly mammoths were very important to ice-age humans, and human survival may have depended on the mammoth in some areas.

Evidence for such coexistence was not recognised until the 19th century.

William Buckland published his discovery of the Red Lady of Paviland skeleton in 1823, which was found in a cave alongside woolly mammoth bones, but he mistakenly denied that these were contemporaries.

In 1864, Édouard Lartet found an engraving of a woolly mammoth on a piece of mammoth ivory in the Abri de la Madeleine cave in Dordogne, France.

The engraving was the first widely accepted evidence for the coexistence of humans with prehistoric extinct animals and is the first contemporary depiction of such a creature known to modern science.

Facts about the wolly mammoth

Be the first to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.


*